Category: Occupy


trump-murdoch

“Rupert is a tremendous guy. I think Rupert [who for several years lived in the Trump building on 59th and Park Avenue in Manhattan] is one of the people I really respect and like. And I think Rupert respects what I’ve done.” But what about Murdoch’s grumpy Trump tweets? “When I got into the world of politics, that was a different realm for me and maybe he felt differently. But I think he respects what I’ve done and he’s a tremendous guy and I think we have a very good relationship.”

Extract from Michael Wolff @ the The Hollywood Reporter (01/06/16)

ps. here @ the interpretOr, we note that the ascendancy of both megalomaniacs was facilitated by the late, and by no means great, Roy Cohn, who arranged Murdoch’s first Oval Office meeting with President Ronald Reagan in 1983…

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK

The Secret History of Superdelegates

712 Democratic officials will decide whether Clinton or Sanders wins the nomination. An In These Timesinvestigation shows that’s just what the party planned all along.
BY BRANKO MARCETIC
The private meetings that led to the creation of superdelegates have never been published or made public — until now.
BY IN THESE TIMES EDITORS
The paper seems bent on taking down Bernie.
BY ADAM JOHNSON
Finkelstein’s book is a call for Jewish suffering to be seen as part of the larger history of suffering under colonialism.
BY MAX AJL
A member of the 1982 commission explains why they created superdelegates and what they hoped to prevent.
BY BRANKO MARCETIC

WORKING IN THESE TIMES

The Verizon Strike Is Not Just About Wages. It Is About Power and Domination Over Workers.

Corporations love the ‘sharing economy’ because it’s built on one thing: greed.
BY ALEX GOUREVITCH

RURAL AMERICA IN THESE TIMES

Big Oil Plots to Exclude Public from Public Land Auctions

Keep It In The Ground is a campaign based on the principle that fossil fuels on public lands must be left inthe ground.
BY STEVE HORN

SPLC The Trump Effect cover

Between March 23 and April 2, 2016, Teaching Tolerance surveyed approximately 2,000 teachers, asking them how the presidential campaign was affecting their students and their teaching. The results indicated that the campaign is having a profoundly negative impact on schoolchildren across the country, producing an alarming level of fear and anxiety among children of color and inflaming racial and ethnic tensions in the classroom. Many students worry about being deported. Many educators fear teaching about the election at all.

A synthesis of our survey results make up the content of this report:The Trump Effect: The Impact of the Presidential Campaign on Our Nation’s Schools. A  complete listing of the 5,000 survey comment is available here.

excerpts:

“My students are terrified of Donald Trump,” says one teacher from a middle school with a large population of African-American Muslims. “They think that if he’s elected, all black people will get sent back to Africa.”

“A Portland, Oregon, middle school teacher reported that her principal had imposed a “gag order” on teachers, prohibiting them from talking about the election. But the order didn’t stop one of her students from telling an immigrant classmate, “When Trump wins, you and your family will get sent back.” On the survey she posed the question, “What does a teacher do? I can assure you that if a student says that loudly and brazenly in class, far worse is happening in the hallway.”

::: simply click cover pic above to access report in pdf @ teachingtolerance.org :::

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK
Iowans have a long history of breaking from party orthodoxy. Our reporting from the state shows that could be good news for Sanders on February 1.
BY THEO ANDERSON
This is what neoliberal governance looks like.
BY JACOB LEDERMAN
Paul Mason, ardent critic of neoliberalism, sees a new epoch ahead.
Why the American Hero trope is so dangerous.
BY SUSAN J. DOUGLAS

New York’s ‘Carwasheros’ Push for Safer, Fairer Workplaces

Car washes are the ‘wild, wild West” of workplace regulation. The Car Wash Accountability Act will improve that–if it is ever implemented.
Author Jeff Halper says the usual explanations of Israel’s behavior didn’t make sense to him.
It’s no coincidence that Trump, the candidate least in need of money or media attention, is the most outspoken against war.
BY LEONARD C. GOODMAN
The Lessons of Syriza’s Failed Push Against Austerity

Austerity policies haven’t worked in Greece, but neither have the radical Left’s efforts to push back against them.
BY BRANKO MARCETIC
The Newspaper That Transformed Black America–And The Course of History

How an ambitious migrant came to Chicago and changed history with the power of journalism.
BY SALIM MUWAKKIL
The grassroots is taking charge of Sanders’ campaign–and they’re not waiting around for the establishment.
BY JIM HIGHTOWER
What a legacy.
BY JOE CONASON
WORKING IN THESE TIMES
Bernie Sanders and Unions’ Relationship Status: It’s Complicated

Many union members say Bernie Sanders should be labor’s choice for president. But convincing unions to endorse him isn’t so simple.
BY DAVID MOBERG
RURAL AMERICA
Communities today face not just the behavior of individual corporations, but a system of law that insulates corporate power from democratic control.
BY THOMAS LINZEY

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK

Some Republican presidential candidates are clamoring for increased U.S. military aid to “moderate” rebels battling Bashar al-Assad’s dictatorship in Syria.

Fortunately, President Obama is taking a far wiser course with a renewed diplomatic effort to resolve that horrendous civil war. But he is not getting the support he needs from his potential Democratic successors.

BY STEPHEN R. WEISSMAN
The Alberta Clipper pipeline is already transporting huge quantities of oil, but is doing so under the radar.
BY BRANKO MARCETIC
Why have the power players of the Democratic Party allowed this to continue?
It’s a blow to progressive journalism, the media union movement and smart, necessary reporting.
BY ARI PAUL

Remembering Hillary’s Entry into Politics–For Junior High President

The story of Hillary Clinton’s first campaign and her outrage at Nixon’s 1960 defeat. Plus her famous chocolate chip cookie recipe.
They’re obscure, they’re poorly distributed–but you can track them down. It will be worth it.
For the most part, Americans don’t think or care much about the real-world consequences of unleashing American air power.
BY RICK SHENKMAN

A New Documentary Explores the Anti-Apartheid Activists in South Africa You Never Learned About

A new film project explores a long-forgotten chapter inthe global struggle against apartheid.
BY PETER COLE

Watching Quentin Tarantino’s Hateful Eight Is Three Hours of Self-Punishment and I Loved It

Tarantino gives us a hangman-based civilization, with specious “law and order” talk doing nothing to obscure the essential cruelty of his characters’ actions.
BY EILEEN JONES
WORKING IN THESE TIMES

Rahm Emanuel Is Trying To Pay Wall Street Banks Even More for Chicago’s Bad Financial Deals

While claiming the city is broke, Chicago’s mayor is stepping up payments to Wall Street.
BY SAQIB BHATTI

Print

Andrea Germanos, staff writer
One presidential hopeful’s assessment is that the child care system in the U.S. is disastrous. And based on the findings of a new survey, many working parents in the U.S. have reason to agree. The Pew Research Center…
Deirdre Fulton, staff writer
Along with a $1.1 trillion spending bill that will keep government funded…
Nadia Prupis, staff writer
The Communications Workers of America (CWA) on Thursday endorsed Sen. Bernie…

human cost warming

As climate talks in Paris approach, stakes are high for frontline communities with the most to lose. Yesterday, UNICEF reported that children will suffer the harshest impacts from rising temperatures. Their findings revealed that “over half a billion children live in extremely high flood occurrence zones; nearly 160 million live in high or extremely high drought severity zones.”

The billions of children in these vulnerable areas are also living below the poverty line. Along with death and devastation brought on by climate change impacts, rising temperatures can also contribute to malnutrition, malaria and diarrhea — all of which are deadly to children. With the WMO revealing that this year is the hottest on record, NGOs are turning up the pressure on negotiators to deliver an even stronger deal to “avert these costs for the world’s poorest people.”

Coverage

Tools and Resources

inthesetimes

 

 

 

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK
It is not a radical political vision. It’s an unflinching commitment to democracy.
BY THEO ANDERSON
The response to the Paris attacks should be to bring back class struggle by insisting on global solidarity of the exploited.
BY SLAVOJ ZIZEK
A stint in the slammer convinced the conservative author that liberals are crooks.
Our response to such unspeakable tragedies can’t be to create even more tragedies in other countries.
It’s unconscionable that refugees fleeing the horrors of war and poverty are being met with calls for their removal by the counties they are seeking safety in.
Some of Zizek’s ideas about Syrian refugees skirt dangerously closely to the Right’s.
Salaita’s settlement is a victory for him and academic freedom. But will we ever know who was watching him?
BY MARILYN KATZ
A new film traces the history of America’s most famous housing projects.
BY MAYA DUKMASOVA
A fundamental aspect of ISIS’ strategy lies in the necessity of a heavy-handed, reactionary response from the West to further their own narrative, ideology and recruiting.
BY TOM ENGELHARDT
Zionism began as class-oriented project within the Jewish community. Opposing it requires a class analysis of who benefits from Zionism within that community.
BY BENJAMIN BALTHASER
Activists said the reading materials were untested, insensitive and clueless.
BY SARAH LAHM
The greatest threat to Israel’s security today is neither ISIS nor Iran, but its own occupation of Palestine.
BY MARC DAALDER
In order to create a more egalitarian society, we must take back the reins of our government from the billionaire class.
BY BERNIE SANDERS

WORKING IN THESE TIMES

Security Guards from Chicago’s O’Hare Airport Join One-Day Nationwide Airport Worker Strike

Security guards at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago walk off the job as part of a wave of labor actions at 11 major American airports this week.
BY TOM LADENDORF

RURAL AMERICA

Industrialized countries are the biggest contributors to global warming, but it is farmers and rural communities that are among the first to suffer from climate change.
BY RURAL AMERICA IN THESE TIMES

worldpeace

turnboilexxon

…excerpt from The Tree:

In the first concrete legal action against ExxonMobil’s web of climate lies, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has announced he will investigate whether the oil giant knowingly misled the public and investors about the dangers of climate change. Last month from InsideClimate News and the Los Angeles Times revealed that Exxon’s own scientists warned the company’s top leadership that burning fossil fuels causes climate change with potentially “catastrophic” impacts as far back as 1977. Yet despite this warning the company spent decades funneling millions of dollars into groups that dispute or cast doubt on the connection between fossil fuels and climate change. With the dirty tactics of fossil fuel companies well and truly in the open, the ExxonMobil investigation should be a warning shot for other companies that they will no longer be allowed to peddle misinformation and must once and for all wake up to the dampening demand for fossil fuels…

More recent coverage of Exxon Mobil climate change revelations…

Projected impact of the former on Paris Climate Talks?

The New Matilda:

‘Malcolm Turnbull’s Dirty Money Means Oz Won’t Be Taken Seriously At Paris Climate Talks, says 350.org’

Climate advocacy group 350.org has demanded Malcolm Turnbull divest from ExxonMobil, which is under investigation for a climate change cover-up…

::: click here for piece in full @ The New Matilda :::

 

inthesetimes

 

 

Newsletter 8 November 2015
TOP STORIES THIS WEEK
A 6-month In These Times investigation finds that the revolving door between government and the chemical industry has led the EPA to rely on easily manipulated research.
BY VALERIE BROWN AND ELIZABETH GROSSMAN
Sawant beat the establishment at its own game. Now comes the hard part.
BY ARUN GUPTA
Wealthy parents pour more resources into their children’s futures, but middle- and lower-income families are being squeezed, resulting in an education gap.
BY SUSAN J. DOUGLAS
Why do many hazardous chemicals go unregulated in the United States? An In These Times investigation reveals the answer.
The White House has finally released the text of the trade deal, and the reviews are scorching.
BY DEIRDRE FULTON
Using the phrase “no fault of their own” in discussing undocumented young people does not encourage us to look at the roots of the poverty and violence their families experience.
BY DAVID BACON
The 82-year old Nation of Islam leader filled the National Mall in October. Why didn’t the media take much notice?
BY SALIM MUWAKKIL
The psychology behind the ‘Notorious RBG’ phenomenon.
BY SADY DOYLE
CPCs have repeatedly provided misleading or, in some cases completely false, information for pregnant women.
BY RACHEL M. COHEN
WORKING IN THESE TIMES
Labor For Bernie Sanders Activists Say They Are Undeterred By Union Endorsements of Hillary Clinton

Despite a number of high-profile endorsements for Clinton, Sanders supporters still say he is the best choice for promoting workers’ rights.
BY MARIO VASQUEZ
RURAL AMERICA
Is it possible to create a more equitable society without all-out social warfare being the catalyst?
BY JOHN COLLINS

“It’s like having a global 24-hour-a-day, 365-day-a-year search warrant running on whole  societies, including Australia.”

Senator Scott Ludlam

snowgreen
Australia accessed private internet data gathered by the NSA even more than Britain, according to a previously unreported document released by Edward…

After marathon negotiations in Atlanta, leaders from 12 nations cement pactwhich coalition of critics say will raise the price of essential drugs, drive industrial scale agribusiness, and threaten workers rights

Print

by Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Amid a last minute scramble, leaders from the United States and 11 other Pacific Rim countries announced Monday that they had reached agreement on a sweeping trade deal, one that critics, including US presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, say will slash standards and protections for both consumers and workers—with impacts to be felt across the globe.

The agreement, known as the Trans Pacific Partnership (or TPP), which would tie together as much as 40 percent of the world’s economy, has for nearly 8 years been negotiated in secret. Though details of the compromise were not yet revealed early Monday, critics said that—minutia aside—the global trade pact will certainly be a boon for corporate power…

“TPP is a deal for big business,” said Nick Dearden, director of the UK-based Nick Dearden,Global Justice Now.

“Wall Street and other big corporations have won again. It is time for the rest of us to stop letting multi-national corporations rig the system to pad their profits at our expense.”
– Bernie Sanders

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was also quick to condemn the deal. Saying he was disappointed but not surprised by the “disastrous” agreement, Sanders added: “Wall Street and other big corporations have won again. It is time for the rest of us to stop letting multi-national corporations rig the system to pad their profits at our expense.”

The compromise was reached after five days of round-the-clock negotiations in Atlanta, Georgia. U.S. President Barack Obama reportedly “spent recent days contacting world leaders to seal the deal.”

The negotiations had been extended after talks got stuck over the issue of how long a monopoly period should be allowed on next-generation biotech drugs. The compromise reportedly reached between the U.S. and Australia “is a hybrid that protects companies’ data for five years to eight years,” the New York Times reports, falling short of the 12 years desired by U.S. negotiators…’

::: click on through for this piece in full @ CommonDreams.org :::

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News & Views | 09.18.15

Featured…

Refugees Left Stranded As EU Faces ‘Crisis of Political Will’
by Andrea Germanos
“You aren’t going to solve these problems by closing borders.”

News…

‘Foolish and Mean-Spirited’: US House Votes to Defund Planned Parenthood
by Deirdre Fulton
Both measures are opposed by women’s health organizations, the White House, and a majority of the American public.
Citing Abuses, US Commission Demands Release of Refugee Families
by Sarah Lazare
The violations are so egregious that all families should be released, detentions reduced, and alternatives to incarceration fostered.
Up 72 Perecent From Just Six Years Ago, Organic Farm Sales Soar
by Nadia Prupis
Americans are increasingly hungry for naturally-grown and healthier foods.
Facing South, Bernie Sanders Ramps Up Outreach in SC and Beyond
by Deirdre Fulton
David is rising against Goliath, with a grassroots campaign meant to increase Sanders’ exposure among minority voters in the Bible Belt and across the South.
According to New IEA Chief, Arctic Drilling Is Stupid Business
by Sarah Lazare
Birol’s statements come amid growing calls to place people and the planet over profit by leaving fossil fuels in the ground.
New Orleans Running ‘Modern Debtors Prison,’ Lawsuit Charges
by Nadia Prupis
Orleans Parish has resurrected unconstitutional “debtors’ prisons” by routinely jailing the region’s poorest residents over their inability to pay court fees and other fines.
more news…

 Views…

Obama’s Fateful Syrian Choice
by Robert Parry
He can either work with Russia’s President Putin to stabilize Syria or he can opt for a confrontation that could lead to an open-ended war.
The Fed Gets It Right. Now Let’s Move to Full Employment
by Isaiah Poole
“The case for raising short-term interest rates is extraordinarily weak. That is not the economy we have today.”
Open Homes, Open Borders: A Dispatch from a German Village Sheltering 400 Refugees
by Melody Ermachild Chavis
There is no end to the long line of human beings underway tonight.
Standing With Ahmed and All Children of Color
by Sonali Kolhatkar
If Obama truly wants America to be great, as his tweet to Ahmed suggests, he can begin by making it a country that treats its Muslim citizens without suspicion.
Resisting the Lure of Intervention
by John Feffer
With each nuclear weapon, jet engine, and space rocket we deploy, we venture further into the Orange Zone, heading blindly, if not boldly, toward the point of no return.
The Republican Foreign Policy Consensus: Lunacy
by Robert Borosage
If you want a president to lead us into constant wars “anywhere in the world,” Republicans have your man.
more views…

Uploaded on Sep 9, 2015 
getup

Under the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), multinational corporations will be able to sue the Australian Government in secret corporate courts over laws that protect our health, environment and workers’ rights.

Australians voted for the government to run our country in the interests of the public, not corporations. Don’t let them hand sovereignty of our country over to foreign corporations.

Learn more about the TPP here: www.getup.org.au/tpp

Print

A former CIA officer described as the latest victim of the Obama administration’s war on whistleblowers has issued a scathing open letter to civil rights groups asking, “Where were you?”…

In the letter published at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jeffrey Sterling, who is black, specifically calls out the NAACP, National Action Network, Rainbow PUSH Coalition, and Congressional Black Caucus, writing “I saw you when other black faces were either killed or mistreated.” But, to these civil rights groups, he writes, he is “invisible.”

In a case that relied on circumstantial evidence, Sterling was convicted in January on nine separate felony charges, including seven counts of espionage.

He was given a 42-month sentence in May, which Norman Solomon, executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy and coordinator of whistleblower advocacy organization ExposeFacts.org, described as “the continuation of a war on whistleblowing and journalism, to clamp down on the absolutely essential flow of information for democracy.”

::: click here or banner for piece in full @ CommonDreams :::

The newly unveiled logo for Sea Shepherd’s Operation Henkaku

Sea Shepherd, August 10, 2015:

The newly unveiled logo for Sea Shepherd’s Operation HenkakuThe Campaign, to be Called ‘Operation Henkaku,’ Translating to ‘Metamorphosis’ or ‘Transformation,’ Reflects Sea Shepherd’s Evolving Efforts to End the Capture and Slaughter of Dolphins and Small Whales and the Growing Global Opposition to this Brutal Hunt…

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society and its team of Cove Guardians will officially launch the sixth consecutive season of Sea Shepherd’s Dolphin Defense Campaign on Sept. 1, 2015 in Taiji, Japan. Titled Operation Henkaku (Operation Metamorphosis), preparations are underway for the campaign, during which Sea Shepherd will once again have an international team of volunteer Cove Guardians stationed along the infamous cove, documenting and live streaming the brutal capture and slaughter of dolphins and pilot whales for the world to see.

In the drive hunt conducted by the Taiji Fishermen’s Union, typically spanning from September until March, more than a thousand cetaceans are driven into the cove each year – some ruthlessly killed before the eyes of their family members and others torn away from their family pods to be sold to captive facilities in Japan or overseas. As Sea Shepherd has documented time and time again, the captive selection process occurs simultaneously to the slaughter – and the lucrative international trade in live dolphins for captivity is the economic fuel that drives the hunting boats in search of pods…

…more seashepherd.org

 

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK

A California judge affirmed that it’s illegal to detain children, and ordered their mothers released, too.

BY JOSEPH SORRENTINO

Attendees at parties across Iowa say that Bernie is “the guy we need right now.”

Andrew Highsmith charts the rise and fall of Flint, a city deserted by industry and divided by segregation.

BY DANIEL HERTZ

The cure for planned Apple-escence.

BY KENDRA PIERRE-LOUIS

The vision of the socialist organizer remains inspiring.

BY MAURICE ISSERMAN

U.S. media commentary on the accord portrays U.S. global military supremacy as natural and desirable.

BY GREGORY SHUPAK

Critics who simply claim that “Coates is no Baldwin” are ignoring what can be a comparison that allows us to understand both writers more deeply.

BY ANDY SEAL

On postwar anti-communist surveillance in Britain.

BY JANE MILLER

Continually policing the ways women talk will further reduce them to silence.

BY MAX BLUMENTHAL

WORKING IN THESE TIMES

As Nabisco Ships 600 Jobs Out of Chicago to Mexico, Maybe It’s Time To Give Up Oreos

Chicago is poised to lose 600 well-paying jobs on the city’s Southwest Side.

BY MARILYN KATZ

RURAL AMERICA

In his new climate encyclical, Pope Francis seeks to rekindle ecological consciousness.

BY DAYTON MARTINDALE

30yearsRSF

Reporters Without Borders is celebrating its 30th birthday...

“These 30 years of struggle could not have been pursued without the community that supports us. We invite you to see how we have defended a cause for 30 years…”

FIND OUT ABOUT YESTERDAY’S AND TODAY’S BATTLES

Right now we are getting constant requests for help from journalists in danger in Burundi, reporters in Syria under attack from both the dictatorship and barbarity, and Saudi bloggers who are jailed without any kind of trial. The needs are enormous and your support is necessary.’

“To move beyond the fossil fuel era is a matter of conscience, a matter of faith and indeed, a matter of our continued existence.”

Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre Lecture presented by the Vancouver Institute. Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre. Naomi Klein is the author of the critically acclaimed #1 international bestsellers, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism and No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies which have each been translated into more than 30 languages. She is a contributing editor for Harper’s Magazine, a reporter for Rolling Stone, and a syndicated columnist for The Nation and The Guardian.
Naomi Klein is a member of the board of directors for 350.org, a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis. Her new book is This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate (September, 2014). This lecture is co-sponsored by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 350.org and Green College.

The 14 Defining Characteristics Of Fascism


Free Inquiry
Spring 2003 
5-11-3

Dr. Lawrence Britt has examined the fascist regimes of Hitler (Germany), Mussolini (Italy), Franco (Spain), Suharto (Indonesia) and several Latin American regimes. Britt found 14 defining characteristics common to each:

1. Powerful and Continuing Nationalism – Fascist regimes tend to make constant use of patriotic mottos, slogans, symbols, songs, and other paraphernalia. Flags are seen everywhere, as are flag symbols on clothing and in public displays.

2. Disdain for the Recognition of Human Rights – Because of fear of enemies and the need for security, the people in fascist regimes are persuaded that human rights can be ignored in certain cases because of “need.” The people tend to look the other way or even approve of torture, summary executions, assassinations, long incarcerations of prisoners, etc.

3. Identification of Enemies/Scapegoats as a Unifying Cause – The people are rallied into a unifying patriotic frenzy over the need to eliminate a perceived common threat or foe: racial , ethnic or religious minorities; liberals; communists; socialists, terrorists, etc.

4. Supremacy of the Military – Even when there are widespread domestic problems, the military is given a disproportionate amount of government funding, and the domestic agenda is neglected. Soldiers and military service are glamorized.

5. Rampant Sexism – The governments of fascist nations tend to be almost exclusively male-dominated. Under fascist regimes, traditional gender roles are made more rigid. Divorce, abortion and homosexuality are suppressed and the state is represented as the ultimate guardian of the family institution.

6. Controlled Mass Media – Sometimes to media is directly controlled by the government, but in other cases, the media is indirectly controlled by government regulation, or sympathetic media spokespeople and executives. Censorship, especially in war time, is very common.

7. Obsession with National Security – Fear is used as a motivational tool by the government over the masses.

8. Religion and Government are Intertwined – Governments in fascist nations tend to use the most common religion in the nation as a tool to manipulate public opinion. Religious rhetoric and terminology is common from government leaders, even when the major tenets of the religion are diametrically opposed to the government’s policies or actions.

9. Corporate Power is Protected – The industrial and business aristocracy of a fascist nation often are the ones who put the government leaders into power, creating a mutually beneficial business/government relationship and power elite.

10. Labor Power is Suppressed – Because the organizing power of labor is the only real threat to a fascist government, labor unions are either eliminated entirely, or are severely suppressed.

11. Disdain for Intellectuals and the Arts – Fascist nations tend to promote and tolerate open hostility to higher education, and academia. It is not uncommon for professors and other academics to be censored or even arrested. Free expression in the arts and letters is openly attacked.

12. Obsession with Crime and Punishment – Under fascist regimes, the police are given almost limitless power to enforce laws. The people are often willing to overlook police abuses and even forego civil liberties in the name of patriotism. There is often a national police force with virtually unlimited power in fascist nations.

13. Rampant Cronyism and Corruption – Fascist regimes almost always are governed by groups of friends and associates who appoint each other to government positions and use governmental power and authority to protect their friends from accountability. It is not uncommon in fascist regimes for national resources and even treasures to be appropriated or even outright stolen by government leaders.

14. Fraudulent Elections – Sometimes elections in fascist nations are a complete sham. Other times elections are manipulated by smear campaigns against or even assassination of opposition candidates, use of legislation to control voting numbers or political district boundaries, and manipulation of the media. Fascist nations also typically use their judiciaries to manipulate or control elections.

They Thought They Were Free

 By Milton Mayer

http://www.thirdreich.net/Thought_They_Were_Free_nn4.html

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK

Sanders’s laser-like focus on inequality is perfectly insync with the nation’s current political climate.

BY THEO ANDERSON

Soon the Right will have to abandon its head-in-the-sand strategy–but its next tactic may be more dangerous.

BY KATE ARONOFF

A hawk’s eye-view of global warming.

BY TODD MILLER AND ALEX DEVOID

Blumenthal offers an unembellished look at the misery on the ground in the Gaza Strip during Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in 2014.

BY BEN LORBER

The New York Times is wrong: consumers eating grapes and mandarin oranges aren’t the ones really guilty of contributing to California’s water shortage.

BY JIM NAURECKAS

Jeb Bush’s Presidential Announcement Was Simultaneously Audacious and Underwhelming

Bush’s presidential campaign announcement was high on the rhetoric. Unfortunately, it was also inconsistent with everything we already know about Jeb Bush.

BY DAVID SIROTA

The activists behind the group are known for pranking big corporate and governmental institutions. Now they have created a tool to help others do the same.

BY MICHAEL PAYNE

The new black comedy about nuclear war misses its target.

BY EILEEN JONES

WORKING IN THESE TIMES

Chicago Charter School Students Say UNO Teacher Was Fired for Union Activism

It’s not every day that students walk out of school to demand the reinstatement of a fired teacher–let alone one they claim was fired for helping unionize the school.

BY CRYSTAL STELLA BECERRIL

RURAL AMERICA

A new bill passed by the North Carolina Senate could prevent evidence of animal cruelty or labor violations on factory farms from ever leaving the workplace.

BY DAYTON MARTINDALE

Glenn Greenwald, best known for his series in “The Guardian” detailing classified information about global surveillance programs based on top-secret documents provided by Edward Snowden, spoke at the University of Utah on Tuesday, April 7, 2015.

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gbreef

excerpt from The Tree:

Two reports have undermined the Abbott Government’s rosy claims about the health of Australia’s World Heritage Great Barrier Reef. TheQueensland Auditor-General has released a scathing report on government efforts to improve the reef’s water quality, finding efforts to cut coral-killing runoff have been ineffective, and that information lacked transparency and misleading. A second report, by the Environmental Justice Australia and the US-based Earthjustice, has also found that the Reef’s current state meets as many as six of the eight criteria UNESCO uses in its “in danger” assessments. UNESCO only needs one for an “in danger” listing. Water quality and sediment issues are having a severe impact on the reef, but despite having knowledge of a report contradicting the government’s exaggerated claims of progress tackling these issues for several weeks, Environment Minister Greg Hunt pushed a misleading “report card” to UNESCO.

This move, part of a $218,000 lobbying effort detailed in documents obtained under FOI, resulted in a draft ruling not to list the natural icon as “in danger”, allowing massive coal projects to go ahead –assuming they don’t fall over economically first. The Federal government’s lobbying strategy may have avoided a negative listing for now, but UNESCO’s verdict was still not positive. The future of the reef and the $5 billion it contributes to the economy annually remains under serious threat if Australia keeps trying to export dirty coal to the world. Tourism operators are already being warned to stop using picturesque underwater photos of bright pink and yellow coral, as the reality is declining water quality is now so poor in places tourists cannot swim or snorkel…

inthesetimes

TOP STORIES THIS WEEK

President Obama insists there’s “nothing secret” about the massive trade deal–yet we aren’t allowed to know anything that’s in it.

BY JOEL BLEIFUSS

 

What happens in Baltimore isn’t going to stay in Baltimore.

BY MARTHA BIONDI

 

The movements of the 1960s challenged the Leave It to Beaver values of American life, producing the culture wars. But those wars are now finished.

BY MICAH UETRICHT

The human tragedies The Water Knife chronicles are already happening today; they’re just not happening to us–yet.

BY JESSICA STITES

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07 Jun 2015 | Scott Ludlam

Housing & Sustainable Cities

excerpt:

“Low and middle-income Australians should not be forced to subsidise property investors through their taxes – it is fundamentally unfair,” Senator Ludlam said today.

“It is time to call an end to this skewed concession that has contributed to the housing bubble and provides a tax benefit ten times greater for the highest income earners than for the lowest.

“Independent costings from the Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO), released today by the Greens, show that by ending negative gearing for new investments we will save $2.9 billion over the forward estimates.

“We propose to invest a substantial part of the savings in new housing supply; to take 15,000 families and individuals off the social housing waiting list over the next four years and directly fund construction of 7000 new homes for the homeless by 2020.

“This will lift employment in the construction sector and boost innovation in the modular housing industry.

“These costings from the PBO give Joe Hockey all the evidence he needs to take a look at negative gearing, rather than blindly ruling it out of their tax review.

“As part of a broader move towards restoring fairness to the tax system, we have also asked the PBO to examine capital gains tax concessions, which are overwhelmingly subsidised by low and middle income taxpayers.

“The Greens will work to deliver a fair and equitable tax system which helps everyone, rather than a system that uses unfair concessions to skew the property market,” Senator Ludlam concluded.

This statement in full @ scott-ludlam.greensmps.org.au/

And here’s a stat to provide a bit more context from Homelessness Australia – ‘Homelessness Australia is the national peak body for homelessness in Australia’ :

1in200var1

 

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