Archive for August 16, 2014


For far too many years suicide prevention has not engaged the perspectives of those who have lived through suicidal experiences. Because of social stigma and fear, as well as personal shame, a culture of silence prevailed. The Way Forward represents a seminal moment in this field’s history; it is an opportunity to benefit from the lived experience of suicide attempt survivors. Many of its recommendations are derived from evidence-based practices, and several are aspirational. All are grounded in the evidence of recovery and resiliency that is clear in the lives of our Task Force members. Viewing suicide prevention through the lens of the eight core values presented in The Way Forward can help us enhance safety while also bringing hope and meaning to those in suicidal despair.

The Core Values represent the group consensus on the values that attempt survivors want suicide prevention professionals and organizations to consider when developing or implementing suicide prevention supports. Research has indicated that promoting protective factors and addressing risk factors for suicide can prevent suicidal behavior.Therefore, it is reasonable to believe that activities that support the Core Values have the potential to prevent future suicide attempts, and improve the quality of life for people who have survived a suicide attempt.

Foster hope and help people find meaning and purpose in life

 Preserve dignity and counter stigma, shame, and discrimination

 Connect people to peer supports

 Promote community connectedness

 Engage and support family and friends

 Respect and support cultural, ethnic, and/or spiritual beliefs and traditions

 Promote choice and collaboration in care

 Provide timely access to care and support

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Zak Mohyuddin was born in Bangladesh, raised in Pakistan and moved to Tennessee years ago, in the 1970s. He was 18 when he arrived. Today, at age 58, he’s a longtime resident in Tullahoma, a small town in Coffee County, halfway between Nashville and Chattanooga...

PRI’s The World:

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…But something else also happened — hitting close to home for Mohyuddin. Barry West — an elected commissioner at the time in the same county that Mohyuddin ran to represent — posted something online that made Mohyuddin shudder.

On West’s Facebook page, he shared an image showing a man with a double-barrel shotgun aiming, with eye closed. The caption read, “How to wink at a Muslim.” It went viral. But instead of ignoring it, Mohyuddin reached out to West and invited him over to his house for dinner.

Mohyuddin said that, during their evening together, West told him how he felt that the “word Muslim and terrorist were one and the same.”

“He didn’t think there was anything he’d done that was out of place,” Mohyuddin said. West said he was surprised by Mohyuddin’s dinner invite, but accepted. He said, “So, I apologized, and went to Zak’s home, my son and I.”

“We met with his family, and just had a real good conversation about the world situation, and what I had done. We were just full of questions,” West said, “because I had never been around a Muslim that close, to ask about his religion, or what he believes in.”

Mohyuddin said that it was important for him to reach out to a neighbor. “It’s not like I’m an immigrant living in a big city, where I can stay within my own community and remain in a bubble,”

PRI’s The World

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Remembering and imagining appear to be very different functions, one recovering true information from the past, the other considering the unreal or exploring the future. And yet many patients with damage to the hippocampus (a structure in the temporal lobes) – and resultant memory impairment – struggle in imagining the future. Moreover, neuroimaging data show the hippocampus is involved in both tasks. Taken together, this evidence suggests that memory for the past and imagination for the future may depend on shared neural processes.

A new imaging study by Brock Kirwan and his colleagues confirms at a broad anatomical level that both memory and future imagination call on similar regions of the hippocampus. But the research also shows how these two mental functions do depend on distinct neural processes after all.

Fourteen study participants were invited into a scanner where they were presented with photographs in a series of runs. One run contained…

... SIMPLY CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THIS PIECE IN FULL & FREE @ THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY RESEARCH BLOG…

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